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Ohio shooting stokes debate over U.S. campus police forces

An impromptu memorial for Samuel Dubose is posted near the crime scene in Cincinnati OhioFor all that was shocking about a university police officer shooting a man at point blank range during a routine traffic stop near the University of Cincinnati campus this month, one thing was not. It is just one of the many powers held by the majority of campus police forces that have become a daily part of university life in the United States but this month came under unprecedented scrutiny. Ranks have grown since campus policing began in earnest amid civil unrest in the late 1960s, as have resources, helping campus police departments become the well-equipped, career-based force they are today.


Read the rest of the story...Ohio shooting stokes debate over U.S. campus police forces

Two Ohio campus police officers won’t face charges: prosecutor

Body cam video shows University of Cincinnati police officers Ray Tensing and Phillip Kidd approaching Dubose vehicle in CincinnatiTwo University of Cincinnati police officers who were interviewed about the death of an unarmed black motorist at the hands of a fellow officer will not face charges, a prosecutor said on Friday. Raymond Tensing, 25, a former University of Cincinnati police officer, has been charged with murder in the shooting death of Samuel DuBose, 43, whom he stopped for a missing license plate. The two other University of Cincinnati officers, Phillip Kidd and David Lindenschmidt, were placed on administrative leave on Thursday.


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How Pentagon war fund became a budget buster Washington can’t resist

A U.S. soldier attends a change of command ceremony at Oqab baseBy Warren Strobel WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The number of U.S. troops deployed in battle zones is at its lowest level since before the 2003 invasion of Iraq. The contradiction is the legacy of an emergency war fund, started in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, that has become a favorite Washington way to sidestep the impact of fiscal constraints on military spending. The Overseas Contingency Operations account, or OCO, has been tapped to fund tens of billions of dollars in programs with questionable links, or none, to wars, according to current and former U.S. officials, analysts and budget documents.


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St. Louis justice system biased against black children, U.S. probe finds

The U.S. Justice Department issued a scathing report Friday, saying the Family Court of St. Louis County has failed to ensure the youth have adequate legal representation, failed to make sure there is probable cause that the children committed offenses they were accused of, and failed to ensure that guilty pleas by black children are entered voluntarily. "The findings we issue today are serious and compelling," Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Vanita Gupta, head of the Civil Rights Division, said in a statement.
Read the rest of the story...St. Louis justice system biased against black children, U.S. probe finds